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Before the soon coming 2019 survey  it is worth to look back at the 2018 survey, cunducted by the Hungarian think-tank Századvég. ​ In the first half of 2016, the  Századvég Foundation conducted a public opinion poll survey extending to all 28 member states of the European Union, and aimed at analysing the opinions of EU citizens regarding the issues that most affect the future of the union. By presenting these results, they attempted to reflect on the drivers behind these shifts…

Sun, 10/20/2019 - 22:08

Excerpt form an article by Maria Schmidt in The New York Times .This is an article from World Review: The State of Democracy, a special section that examines global policy and affairs through the perspectives of thought leaders and commentators. “Nine years have passed since Mr. Orban’s landslide victory in 2010, in which he won over two-thirds of parliamentary seats — a feat he has since repeated twice. This is a clear demonstration of the popularity and success of his policies.…

Fri, 10/18/2019 - 11:34

Excerpts from the short analysis after the Hungarian Parlamentary elections by Dénes Sályi, columnist of Hungary Today   An unexpected political situation has developed in Hungary after the local elections, where the united Opposition attained considerably stronger positions than predicted. Fidesz has remained the strongest political actor, having attracted over 50% of the voters, and its capability of governing the country hasn’t been questioned. However, the party has to…

Fri, 10/18/2019 - 09:59

Polish enterprises constitute 20 percent of the fastest-growing technology companies in Central Europe, according to the latest ranking by Deloitte Technology Fast 50 Central Europe 2019. The top twenty on the list included three Polish companies: Semantive (14th place), Polish Standard Payments (17th place) and TestArmy Group (18th place). As in previous years, the ranking was dominated by software development companies. Most companies come from the Czech Republic (19). Poland, with…

Fri, 10/18/2019 - 08:08

The "Clasps and buttons with a rust eagle..." contest is an educational project carried out by the National Education Office of the Institute of National Remembrance in cooperation with the Katyń Museum in Warsaw. It is addressed to young people and secondary school teachers. The participants of this year's contest held for the 10th time had the task of creating a card for a family album about a specific Katyń Massacre victim. The prize for first degree laureates - authors and work content…

Thu, 10/17/2019 - 10:09

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22:08
Before the soon coming 2019 survey  it is worth to look back at the 2018 survey, cunducted by the Hungarian think-tank Századvég. ​ In the first half of 2016, the  Századvég Foundation conducted a…
11:34
Excerpt form an article by Maria Schmidt in The New York Times .This is an article from World Review: The State of Democracy, a special section that examines global policy and affairs through the…
09:59
Excerpts from the short analysis after the Hungarian Parlamentary elections by Dénes Sályi, columnist of Hungary Today   An unexpected political situation has developed in Hungary after the local…
08:08
​ Polish enterprises constitute 20 percent of the fastest-growing technology companies in Central Europe, according to the latest ranking by Deloitte Technology Fast 50 Central Europe 2019. The top…
10:09
The "Clasps and buttons with a rust eagle..." contest is an educational project carried out by the National Education Office of the Institute of National Remembrance in cooperation with the Katyń…
08:46
​ During  parliamentary elections in Poland 61% of Poles chose their representatives. Check the summary of the results and the new Sejm and Senate delegates. Last night brought the hottest…
08:39
​ What does it mean to be a Hungarian from Carpathian Ruthenia? Carpathian Ruthenia was part of Austria-Hungary until World War I, then Czechoslovakia, before World War II Carpatho-Ukraine was…
08:33
In Hungary, a new book by Łukasz Kobeszko has just been published, devoted to the changes that have taken place in Poland over the last four years. We talked to Prof. Maciej Szymanowski, Director of…
08:26
​ Hungarian PM Viktor Orbán congratulated Poland’s ruling Law and Justice (PiS) party Sunday’s election victory on Hungarian TV. During a TV programme on Sunday after Hungary’s local and Poland’s…
13:44
Polish-Hungarian Forum (part II)    

Wacław Felczak - . born: 29 May 1916 in Golbice, died: 23 Oktober 1993 in Warsaw

Between 1939-1945, Felczak was the head of an organization of secret couriers who carried information between Poland, Hungary and the West on behalf of the Polish Government-in-Exile in London. After the war, the Polish historian continued to serve the Polish Government-in-Exile, often travelling himself to communist-occupied Poland with important secret documents. Arrested by the communists in 1947, he was sentenced to life but released in 1956 as a result of the thaw following Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev's speech at the 20th Congress of the Communist Party in which he denounced Joseph Stalin.

 As a staunch anticommunist, Felczak started returning to Hungary in the late 1970s, giving secret seminars to the leaders of Hungarian anticommunist underground. He championed a vision in which Central Europe, through joint efforts, would be able to throw off the Soviet communist yoke.

He spent the 1987-88 winter semester at Eötvös Collegium in Budapest where the taught Polish history. A young Viktor Orban (who wrote his master's thesis on the Polish anticommunist trade union "Solidarity") attended one of his lectures together with a group of anticommunist activist friends and asked Professor Felczak for advice on how to best fight communism. Felczak advised him to start a political party. A couple of months later, Orban became one of the founding members of Fidesz; the party which has ruled Hungary since 2010.